Review: 4**** Titus Andronicus The Show Must Go Online @robmyles #ShakespeareDeck #cultureduringquarantine #staycreative

Tweetingit: 4* The ancient and modern meet head on as social media lends a hand in this inventive production of Shakespeare’s bloodiest tale.

The techno phobe lurking deep within me is now under control thanks in no small part to the ever inventive Show Must Go Online. It’s difficult to imagine how a theatrical production could possibly work on Zoom via YouTube. But these talented thespians turn the trick despite a maddening dip in sound levels.

However the company were undaunted and the gremlins were thankfully defeated. Zoom splits the screen which can feature anything between two and eight actors at any given time. Stage directions are provided with vision mixing according to the requirements of each scene. A green border marked the actor when they spoke as a surprisingly tense live performance began.

Titus Andronicus explores the vagaries of power and ambition as fragile alliances are made and broken at will. The Roman Emperor is dead and his sons Saturninus (Wayne Lee) and Bassianus (Khuyen Le) are fighting over who should succeed him. However Marcus Andronicus (Julia Walker Wyson) appears to calm troubled waters with the announcement that brother Titus (Michael Bertenshaw) is the people’s choice of Emperor. Titus will shortly return from a victorious war against the Goths with numerous scores to settle.

From an actor’s point of view it can’t be easy delivering a performance under these conditions. Actors invariably take their cue from other cast members.

They rely on gestures and mannerisms when delivering a line. Eye contact is vital in timing the correct response especially on stage. All these physical prompts the actors might rely upon are, inevitably largely missing but this did not matter. There was the occasional moment where they spoke over each other’s lines and in these circumstances, this is an occupational hazard but it never troubled the performer nor viewer. The company happily improvised props and links to smooth the transition between scenes.  

An actor will never just do a reading, it is always more than that and this group of fantastic actors prove this.

The Show Must Go Online has also produced an online guide for viewers staging a themed party including themed drinks and food. The mind wanders to dark places where Titus Andronicus is concerned but hey, why not?   

Director: Rob Myles

Next week is Richard III

To support the production, go to their patreon

To watch, go to their YouTube page

Review: 3*** Love Never Dies – via the Shows Must Go On YouTube @OfficialALW #cultureduringquarantine #stayathome #musicals

Tweetingit: 3*** Andrew Lloyd Webber’s magic touch just about sees this sequel to Phantom through any rough patches. But it’s sometimes difficult to see the join with plainly familiar melodies.

The sequel is generally confined to the big screen where we’re accustomed to roman numerals in the title and resigned to the money printing potential of a follow-up tale. However, in the theatre it’s rarely if ever tried with any degree of success. 

Who else but Andrew Lloyd Webber would have the nerve and financial muscle to pull it off? Despite ALW’s protestations Love Never Dies is a sequel to Phantom of the Opera. Negative previews in 2010 forced a re-write before it opened for a year-long run in the West End. However, a planned Broadway transfer was shelved after more mixed reviews.  The show decamped to Australia in 2011 where it generally found a warmer reception.  This film is a recording of the show staged at the Regent Theatre in Melbourne.

Continue reading “Review: 3*** Love Never Dies – via the Shows Must Go On YouTube @OfficialALW #cultureduringquarantine #stayathome #musicals”

Review: 4**** Treasure Island – The National Theatre at Home via YouTube @PatsyFerran @NTLive #NationalTheatreAtHome #TreasureIsland #cultureduringquarantine

Tweetingit: 4* A one-legged man with a parrot on his shoulder looking for treasure never fails to grip the imagination. A classic story refreshed and rebooted for the London stage.

For a novel first published in 1883 Treasure Island remains an enduring classic.  No less than nineteen film and TV adaptations have been made including animated features and a memorable Muppet movie. The story’s appeal lies in the spirit of adventure and promise of untold riches, fighting with pirates and stealing away hidden treasure. We played this story out in our minds as children and this excellent production recreates the magic once again.

Old sailor Billy Bones (Aidan Kelly) takes up lodging at the Admiral Benbow Inn on the English coast. Innkeeper’s child Jim Hawkins (Patsy Ferran) learns of a one-legged seafaring man while Bones fights with old shipmate Black Dog (Daniel Coonan). A blind beggar called Pew (David Stern) later tempts Bones with the promise of a map showing buried treasure. However, Bones dies of a stroke shortly afterwards as Pew and cronies lay siege to the Inn. Hawkins and her mother escape with a package taken from Bones’ belongings. The package contains a map of an island where infamous pirate Captain Flint had hidden treasure. With the help of Dr Livesey (Alexandra Maher) and squire Trelawney (Nick Fletcher) they raise an expedition to the island. Their appointed crew includes the mysterious Long John Silver (Arthur Darvill), a man with history and more than a passing interest in the booty.

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Review: 3*** East – The Vaudeville Theatre @digitaltheatre @VaudevilleTh #cultureduringquarantine #stevenberkoff

Tweetingit: 3* A smartly scripted verse play from the cultured pen of Stephen Berkoff is a hit and miss affair but still generates a distinctive aura of time and place.

Stephen Berkoff made his name as a villain in numerous film roles where he grappled with James Bond and Rambo among many others. He even mastered Adolph Hitler in TV blockbuster War and Remembrance. However, Berkoff’s spiritual home is the theatre where his skills as a playwright were honed. East was first performed in 1975 and this is the 25th-anniversary production captured live at the Vaudeville Theatre in London.

The play is an occasionally witty and frequently explicit portrayal of life in London’s East End. The anatomy of a rowdy working class family is explored in a series of vignettes – love, romance, family and friendship are all recurring themes battling for centre stage. Mike (Christopher Middleton) and Les (Matthew Cullum) are two likely lads competing for the affections of flirtatious Sylv (Tanya Franks). Mum and Dad (Edward Bryant and Jonathan Lindsey) survey the unfolding chaos and reminisce about the good old days.

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Review: 5**** Les Miserables 25th Anniversary Concert – The 02 Arena, London via @SkyArts #CultureinQuarantine @AlfieBoe @MsLeaSalonga @realmattlucas

Tweetingit: 5* Victor Hugo’s sprawling epic seamlessly transfers from stage to the stadium rock atmosphere of London’s 02 Arena. A perfect production showcasing rare genius.

Once upon a time I acquired the hardback version of Les Miserables by Victor Hugo. Needless to say 1,232 pages stayed in pristine condition as I contrived excuses not to read it. Hugo’s masterpiece had so many alternative uses – mine was primarily a doorstop before its convenient loss during a house move. Any literary guilt was assuaged by the brilliant stage version that first graced the London stage in 1985. My own twisted logic dictated that I no longer needed to read the book. It is after all a brilliantly distilled version of the novel that marries narrative with beautifully constructed songs.

This film made in 2010 marked the 25th anniversary of the show’s first production at the Barbican. The transfer from theatre to the stadium like 02 Arena might at first present a challenge. However, Les Mis easily fills the 20,000 capacity venue as the songs grow bigger and better. Two giant screens flank a full orchestra and huge choir stretching across the stage.  Sets are stripped away as cast members take the stage in authentic 19th Century costume. The unique atmosphere was obvious even on the small screen and one could sense the film captured a very special night.

Continue reading “Review: 5**** Les Miserables 25th Anniversary Concert – The 02 Arena, London via @SkyArts #CultureinQuarantine @AlfieBoe @MsLeaSalonga @realmattlucas”

Review: 3*** Antony and Cleopatra – RSC at Stratford-Upon-Avon @MarqueeArtsTV @TheRSC #staycreative

Tweetingit: 3* A well-drilled, highly talented cast go through the numbers and deliver a slick production. But this feels like an overly sterile approach to an infrequently staged play.

Well three hours four minutes and thirty five seconds is a bit of a stretch even for a battle hardened theatre goer like me. But I was undaunted by the marathon that is Antony and Cleopatra. Watching online is a less onerous prospect as it can be split into bite sized viewing portions.

Even so, a highly efficient production by the RSC at Stratford-Upon-Avon is still heavy going. There is a slavish commitment to detail that adds little to the narrative and sails dangerously close to self-indulgence. Tony and Cleo is essentially a love job hovering between tragedy and history – a tale supercharged by the greatest power brokers of the ancient world.

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Review: 4**** The Importance of Being Earnest – The Vaudeville Theatre @marqueetv @VaudevilleTh #CultureDuringQuarantine #theatre

Tweetingit: 4* The big daddy of farce taking pot shots at Victorian social convention to great comic effect. A wonderful production showcasing the legendary wit of Oscar Wilde.

When The Importance of Being Earnest premiered in February 1895 it represented the zenith of Oscar Wilde’s career. It was also a personal nadir as his affair with Lord Alfred Douglas was exposed. Lord Alfred’s father, the Marquis of Queensbury tried to attend the first night and present him with a bouquet of rotten vegetables. He was barred from entering but the damage was already done as the play closed after 86 performances.

The subsequent trial scandalised Victorian sensibility as Wilde was convicted of gross indecency. A glittering talent was shattered as he was imprisoned for two years. His death at the painfully young age of 46 only served to heighten the work of a genius. The play itself inspired many of the modern farces written by Ray Cooney and Michael Frayn. However, they lacked the verbal dexterity of Wilde’s razor like script.

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Review: 4**** Private Lives – The Gielgud Theatre Via@digitaltheatre @tobysnews @GielgudTheatre @PlowmanAL

Tweetingit: 4* Noel Coward’s comedy of manners still seems fresh as a sparkling production mixes a sharp script with some wonderfully manic slapstick sequences.

When Private Lives premiered in 1930 Noel Coward was approaching the peak of his powers as a playwright.

It landed in the middle of a prolific spell that saw 26 of his plays performed in a twenty year period following the Great War. Book-ended by The Vortex and Blithe Spirit it stands out as an enduring example of his finest work. Billed as a comedy of manners it relies on a series of coincidences that stretch credibility to breaking point. But Coward’s rhythmic prose makes the plot work with the assistance of a poised and skilful cast.

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Review 3*** Falling in Love Again – King’s Head Theatre

Tweetingit: 3* An enjoyable if lightweight tale of the King of England and Queen of Hollywood. Some things never change!

With exquisite timing the premiere of Falling in Love Again lands at the King’s Head Theatre. Slap bang in the middle of this week’s crisis in the Royal Family one wonders if mystical powers are at play. It tells the story of a meeting between two 20th Century icons; the ill-fated King Edward VIII and movie siren Marlene Dietrich.

A brilliant premise for a play and based on true events. Dietrich visited Fort Belvedere on the eve of King Eddie’s abdication; and this is Ron Elisha’s take on what might have happened that night.

It’s December 1936 and the House of Windsor is about to rock with the King (Ashton Spear) preparing for abdication. But wouldn’t you know it Marlene Dietrich (Ramona von Pusch) pops in for a cup of tea. Preparing to forsake his country for the woman he loves; and then confronted by one of Hollywood’s sexiest women; what is a King to do?  The pair spend the evening verbally jousting with Dietrich at her seductive best. But will Edward fall for her fatal charm and slip off the wagon one last time?

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Review: 3*** An Act of God – The Vaults @thevaultsuk @ActOfGodLondon @leakstarches

Tweetingit: 3* Think the Ten Commandments could use a re-boot? Comedian Zoe Lyons imagines God in stand-up mode; predictable but occasionally very funny.

An Act of God presents something of a moral conundrum, re-treading themes that have kept satirists busy for generations. It belongs to the same family of writing that produced the Life of Brian and Book of Mormon. However, where Brian and Mormon concentrate broadly on the concept of faith; this play goes back one stage further; what if God popped down and re-drafted the Ten Commandments for 21st Century consumption. In fact, what if God was a lesbian comedian in silk pyjamas; or in Zoe Lyons’ words ‘Sharon Osbourne’s dykey niece?’. An interesting concept without doubt; more importantly how would God judge the human race and its achievements? With the assistance of Archangels Michael (Matt Tedford) and Gabriel (Tom Bowen); Zoe re-writes the Ten Commandments with a critical assessment of life’s biggest questions.

Essentially, we see God in stand-up mode with a source of material that most comedians could only dream about. Zoe methodically ticks off each commandment offering a detailed progress report. Think of God as Head Teacher delivering a pupil assessment. Archangel Gabriel holds an I-Pad tablet (geddit?!) and scribbles notes on the wall; meanwhile Archangel Michael mingles with the audience seeking questions they’ve always wanted to ask God. It’s a reasonably coherent piece that holds together with some genuinely funny throwaway lines. The play has already been a hit on Broadway, and writer David Javerbaum has written bespoke material for a British audience. So I was baffled by the inclusion of some poorly judged gags. A line about the holocaust was a huge blunder; there is potential for a reactive piece drawing on current events but opting for the jugular is not a good look.

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